Courses Offered

Course Directory

 Number         

 Requirement     

Title, Credits
Semester Last Offered
Description

BIOL 1040

 

The DNA Revolution in Science and Society (3)
Fall 24

Imagine a world where your DNA is sequenced for free and any human gene can be altered at will. The goal of this course is to address the question: can our society be better prepared for this transformation in science? Is genetic privacy achievable or genetic discrimination avoidable? Who owns your genes? Do your genes drive your medical future? Classes involve student perspectives and discussions with experts in science, policy, ethics and law.

BIOL 2100

Major Prereq

Introduction to Biology with Laboratory: Cell Biology & Genetics (4)
Summer 24, Fall 24

BIOL 2100 is one of two semester courses that together provide an intensive introduction to biology for prospective Biology majors and pre-health (med, vet, dental) students. This course focuses on the fundamentals of cell biology and genetics with an emphasis on classical and modern experimental approaches. Lecture topics and concepts are reinforced and extended during once-weekly laboratory/small group discussions.

BIOL 2200

Major Prereq

Introduction to Biology w/Laboratory: Organismal & Evolutionary Biology (4)
Spring 24, Summer 24

BIOL 2200 is one of two semester courses that together provide an intensive introduction to biology for prospective Biology majors and pre-health (med, vet, dental) students. This course focuses on evolution, physiology and development. Lecture topics and concepts are reinforced and extended during once-weekly laboratory/small group discussions. The Introductory courses are not sequenced and may be taken in either order.

BIOL 3000

BA/BS
Core

Cell Biology (3)
Fall 24, Spring 24

Examines the fundamental principles of eukaryotic cell biology at the molecular level. Topics will include: structure and function of the plasma membrane, transport of small molecules, ions and macromolecular complexes across membranes, protein trafficking, the cytoskeleton, signal transduction pathways , and the control of cell division and cellular proliferation. Prerequisites: Must have completed BIOL 2010 or BIOL 2100 or BME 2104 and any two of the following classes CHEM 1410, 1420, 1810 & 1820. BIOL 3000 is not repeatable.

BIOL 3010

BA/BS
Core

Genetics and Molecular Biology (3)
Fall 24, Spring 24

What makes humans different from fruit flies? Why does your brain have neurons and not liver cells? This course is all about the answer to these questions: It's the genes! This course covers the chemical make-up of genes, how they're passed on through generations, how they're expressed and how that expression is regulated, how disruption in the structure and expression of genes arise and how those disruptions lead to cellular defects and disease. Prerequisite: Must have completed BIOL 2010 or BIOL 2100 or BME 2104 and either CHEM 1410 or CHEM 1810 or CHEM 1610. BIOL 3010 is not repeatable.

BIOL 3020

BA/BS
Core

Evolution and Ecology (3)
Spring 24

Examines the mechanisms of evolutionary change, with an emphasis on the genetic and evolutionary principles needed to understand the diversification of life on earth.  Covers the ecology of individuals and population dynamics.  Major topics include the genetics and ecology of natural populations, adaptation, molecular evolution and macroevolution, and the application of evolutionary and ecological concepts to conservation biology.  Required for all Biology majors. Prerequisite: Must have completed BIOL 2200 or BIOL 2020. BIOL 3020 is not repeatable.

BIOL 3030

BS
Core

Biochemistry (3)
Fall 24

Biochemistry underlies nearly every biological process, from environmental science to medicine. When living systems are in chemical and energetic balance, organisms thrive. When they're out of balance, as in disease or unpredictable environments, life is compromised. This course will explain how simple chemical and physical principles apply to the major classes of biological macromolecules that maintain life. Prerequisite: BIOL 2010 or BIOL 2100 or BME 2104 and BIOL 2020 or BIOL 2040 and either CHEM 2410 or CHEM 1820

BIOL 3040

BS
Core

Developmental and Regenerative Biology (3)
Spring 22

Are developmental biology and regenerative biology one and the same? Throughout this course, we will emphasize both classical and modern experimental approaches that have been used to unravel the genetic, molecular and celluar mechanisms of development. Additionally, the practical value of understanding development is enormous, and the relationship between embryology and clinical applications will be a theme that runs throughout the course.

BIOL 3050

BS
Core

Introduction to Neurobiology (3)
Fall 24

Analyzes the concepts of general neurobiology, including basic electrophysiology and electrochemistry, origin of bioelectric potentials, sensory, motor, integrative and developmental neurobiology, and conceptual models of simple learning. Prerequisite: Must have completed BIOL 2010 or BIOL 2100 or BME 2104 and BIOL 2020 or BIOL 2040. May not take if previously completed BIOL 3170.

BIOL 3090

Area II

Our World of Infectious Disease (3)
Spring 24

Infectious disease impacts every human, plant and animal on earth. What is the most deadly disease in human history? What is killing our ocean's turtles? Why is Zika so scary? We will explore questions related to the biology, transmission, and pathogenicity of infectious agents across the world. We will also place special emphasis on what it takes to successfully control an infectious disease.

BIOL 3180

Area II

Introduction to Plants and Society (3)
Spring 24

This is an introductory course that takes a multidisciplinary approach to studying the relationship between plants and people. The course focuses on providing students foundational information on the growth, development, physiology and genetics of plants and explores the connection between plants and people by looking at the use of plants as sources of food, shelter, medicinals and manufactured goods.

BIOL 3230

Area II

Animal Physiology (3)
Spring 24

Focuses on selected vertebrate organ systems; considers other systems where relevant. Prerequisite: BIOL 2010 and 2020.

BIOL 3240

Area I

Introduction to Immunology (3)
Spring 24

Studies the genetics and cell biology of the vertebrate immune system, with a focus on adaptive immunity. Classic and current experimental systems are emphasized. Prerequisite: Must have completed or be currently taking BIOL 2010 or BIOL 2100 or BME 2104

BIOL 3250

Area III

Introduction to Animal Behavior (3)
Spring 24

An introduction to comparative studies of animal behavior from neuroethological and evolutionary prospectives. The first deals with proximate causes of behavior, with emphasis on motor, sensory and central aspects of the nervous system. The second deals with ultimate causes, with emphases on natural selection, natural history, and adaptive aspects of behavior.

BIOL 3260

Area I

Editing Genes and Genomes (3)
Spring 24

Genome databases contain a wealth of information that enable us to answer myriad questions in biology. Working with genome data requires foundational knowledge in molecular genetic concepts, as well as technical knowledge of how to read and analyze sequence data. This class will provide students with the skills to understand genomic data and its applications in biology and medicine.

BIOL 3270

Area II
Lab

General Microbiology with Laboratory (4)
Spring 24

Microbes rule. In this course, we will explore how microbes rule the world and how genomics has revolutionized the way we study them. Fundamental principles of microbiology will be introduced. Topics include microbial cell structure, metabolism, genetics, diversity, evolution and infectious disease. Laboratory work will complement lecture topics and cover the core themes & concepts, as recommended by the American Society of Microbiology.

BIOL 3410

Area II
Lab

Human Anatomy and Physiology I (4)
Fall 24, Summer 24

This course, the first in a two-course sequence, is an introduction to the structure and function of the human body. Review of the structure and physiology of cells and tissues leads to in-depth study of the musculoskeletal and nervous systems. Control mechanisms and the contributions of each system to overall homeostasis are emphasized.

BIOL 3420

 

Human Anatomy and Physiology II (4)
Spring 24

This course, the second in a two-course sequence, examines structures and functions of the endocrine, cardiovascular, urogenital, respiratory, renal, gastrointestinal and reproductive systems. Control mechanisms and functional integration of these systems in overall homeostasis is emphasized.
Note: this course may not be used toward Biology Major or Minor Requirements

BIOL 3450

Area III

Biodiversity and Conservation (3)
Fall 24 

Introduction to the fundamental principles of conservation biology (e.g., global species numbers, value of biodiversity, causes of extinction, genetic diversity, island biogeography, priority setting) and current topics of debate (including zoo versus field conservation, effects of global change on species extinction). Conservation case studies will allow students to judge the relevance of biological theory to practical problems in conservation.

BIOL 3559

Area II

Physiological Basis of Human Health and Disease (3)    
New course in the subject of biology.

BIOL 4005

Area I
Lab

Functional Genomics Laboratory: Disease Mechanisms & Cures (3)
Spring 22

This course introduces students to scientific-based discovery of how molecular dysfunction leads to disease. It also exposes them to the most current tools used in biomedical research to find novel genes and compounds that could help treat human disease. The course includes discovery-oriented lab, workshops, and lectures. Prerequisite: BIOL3000 and BIOL3010

BIOL 4011

Area II

Homeostasis: The Wisdom of the Body (3)
Spring 24

The human body maintains stable energy levels, hydration, and temperature despite the challenges of ever-changing external environment, a process known as homeostasis. This course explores biological models and mechanisms of homeostasis, including how survival needs are monitored and met through changes in behavior and physiology. Students will gain a state-of-the-art perspective on homeostatic biology and its research methods and technology.

BIOL 4012

Area III

Evolution and Ecology of Infectious Diseases (3)
Fall 24

In this course, we'll dive into our current understanding of the evolution and ecology of parasitic interactions through primary literature, modeling, and experimental design. Throughout, we will focus on generating and testing hypotheses, evaluating theoretical models with evidence, drawing parallels between diverse domains of life, and connecting evolutionary and ecological ideas to today's past, present, and future epidemics.

BIOL 4013

Area I

Stem Cells in Development and Disease (3)
Spring 22

The course will deep dive into what stem cells are, what they do, where and how they function, and how we can use stem cells in the clinic to repair damaged tissue and restore tissue function. The course will consist of a series of lectures and student run discussions related to current scientific literature.

BIOL 4014

Area II

Cellular Origins of Animal Diversity (3)
Spring 23

Animals are incredibly diverse, but they all evolved from the same single-celled ancestor that lived hundreds of millions of years ago. This course takes a cell-biological approach to explore key questions in animal evolution such as the origins of multicellularity and differentiation. Students will gain a cutting-edge perspective on current research that integrates cell, developmental, and evolutionary biology to explore animal origins.

BIOL 4016

Area I

Genetic Approaches to Precision Medicine (3)
Spring 23

This course addresses the impact of the human genome project on understanding human genetic disease, focusing on the invaluable role for animal models of diseases in augmenting evaluation of genomic information to develop strategies for precision medicine. Animal models are an invaluable asset in reaching this goal because they allow experimental manipulations that go far beyond what is possible in human patients.

BIOL 4018

Area II
Lab

NextGen Sequencing: Minion the Microbe Detective (3)
Fall 23
 
Microbes rule. This course will teach microbial genomics using the cutting edge next-generation DNA sequencing technology and its applications to study microbes around us. Topics covered include microbial genomics, DNA sequencing and sequence analysis.

BIOL 4019

Area II

Psychopharmacology of Plants (3)
Fall 24

This course begins with discussion of pharmacological principles and normal function of the nervous and endocrine system. As we continue, we will describe how exogenous substances derived from plants (like drugs) impact the nervous system to restore normal or near-normal function, or alter normal function, in humans. The use of agents from plants in the alleviation of depression and anxiety will be emphasized.

BIOL 4020

Area III
Lab

Computational Evolutionary Biology Lab (3)
Fall 24

The evolutionary history of a population can be studied by examining patterns of genetic variation among individuals. Using information about genetic variation, we can infer historical evolutionary events like migration and adaptation. In this lab course, you will learn to utilize genomic data to conduct evolutionary inference. We will learn fundamentals of population genetics, bioinformatic skills, and research methods applied to real short-read sequencing data.

BIOL 4040

Area I
Lab

Laboratory in Cell Biology (3)
Spring 24

Introduces students to experimental approaches, including mammalian cell culture, gel electrophoresis, western blotting and immunofluorescence microscopy, that are used to study both normal and pathological processes at the level of individual cells. The biological theme of the course will be Alzheimer's disease (AD) and related neurodegenerative disorders. One laboratory lecture and one afternoon laboratory per week. Prerequisite: BIOL 3000

BIOL 4045

Area I

Neurodegenerative Diseases (3)
Fall 24

This course for advanced undergrads will focus mainly on research about Alzheimer's disease, and will meet once/week for 3 hours. The first 3 weeks will be primarily didactic, and the remainder of the course will be a "journal club" in which primary research paper discussions will be led by teams of students. Assessments will be based on how well students lead and participate in discussions, and on exams.

BIOL 4070

Area II
Lab

Developmental Biology Laboratory (3)
Fall 24, Spring 24

The goal of this course is to provide an original, unknown outcome research experience in developmental biology. After training in basic methods and descriptions of selected research problems, students form teams and investigate a problem of their choosing. Team members work together in the lab, but each writes an independent research proposal, a notebook, and a final project report on which they are graded. Prerequisite: BIOL 3000 or 3010.

BIOL
4080
Area II

Advanced Hormones and Behavior (3)
Fall 24

From plants to humans, hormones shape various aspects of organismal form and behavior over contemporary and evolutionary time. Delve into endocrine pathways, hormones' influence on development, and their role in coordinating responses to environmental and physiological stimuli. Gain a deep understanding endocrinology theories, concepts, and methods, and the ability to critically evaluate hormonal impacts on ecosystem and human health.

BIOL 4130

Area III

Population Ecology and Conservation Biology (3)
Fall 24

The mathematical foundations of population dynamics and species interactions as applied to population and community ecology and problems in conservation biology. One semester of calculus is recommended. Prerequisite: BIOL 3020 or EVSC 3200

BIOL 4135

Area III

Biology of Aging (3)
Fall 21 

Aging is an evolutionary paradox because it decreases physiological function and increases the risk of mortality, yet aging persists in most species. We will explore the theories of aging and the diversity of the patterns of aging across species from flies to plants to humans. We will use the primary literature in the fields of evolution, genetics and cell biology to gain a comprehensive understand of the latest advances in this field.

BIOL 4150

Area III

Evolution of Sex (3)
Fall 24

Despite the many benefits of asexual reproduction, the vast majority of eukaryotic organisms reproduce sexually. How sex evolved, and how it persists despite its many associated costs, are major unanswered questions in biology. We will explore the diversity of sexual reproduction and associated evolutionary phenomena with a focus on critically evaluating current research and theory in this field. Prerequisite: BIOL 3020 or permission from Instructor

BIOL 4190

Area I

Biological Clocks (3)
Fall 24

Introduces biological timekeeping as used by organisms for controlling diverse processes, including sleep-wakefulness cycles, photoperiodic induction and regression, locomotor rhythmicity, eclosion rhythmicity, and the use of the biological clock in orientation and navigation. Prerequisite: BIOL 3000 or 3010 or 3020

BIOL 4250

Area I

Human Genetics (3)
Fall 24

Focuses on the fundamental knowledge about organization, expression, and inheritance of the human genome. Reviews classical Mendelian genetics and human genetic (pedigree) analysis. Emphasizes understanding human genetics in molecular terms. Includes gene mapping procedures, methodologies for identifying genes responsible for inherited diseases, the molecular basis of several mutant (diseased) states, the human genome project, and discussions about genetic screening and gene therapy. Prerequisite: BIOL 3010.

BIOL 4260

Area I

Cellular Mechanisms (3)
Spring 24

The course will explore topics in cell biology that underlie mechanisms of human health and disease. Specific topics will depend on interest, but may include cancer and metastasis, metabolic syndromes or pathogen-host interactions (among others). Course materials will be research and review articles from the relevant primary literature. Students are expected to engage in and lead thoughtful discussions of assigned readings ~75% of the class time. Prerequisites: BIOL 3000 and BIOL 3010

Corrected prerequisites: BIOL 3000 and any one of BIOL 3010, 3030, 3050, or any one of CHEM 4410, 4420, 4440.

BIOL 4270

Area II
Lab

Animal Behavior Laboratory (3)
Fall 24

This laboratory course provides hands-on experiences with experimental approaches used to study animal behavior. The laboratory exercises explore visual and auditory sensory perception, biological clock, reproductive and aggressive behaviors using actively behaving animals such as hamsters, cichlid fish, crickets and electric fish. Students are given opportunities to design hypothesis-testing experiments in some laboratories.

BIOL 4280

Area I

The Genetic Basis of Behavior (3)
Fall 22 

This course studies behavior paradigms in model animals and the modern genetic tools used study and dissect the circuits underlying them. Can an animal as simple as a fly or mouse learn simple tasks, show appetitive behaviors and cravings, and inform studies of human addiction? Readings from classic and current literature will show the historical context of this field and develop critical reading skills. Prerequisites: BIOL 3000, BIOL 3010

BIOL 4310

Area I

Sensory Neurobiology (3)
Spring 24

This two-lectures-per-week course explores the basic principles of sensory neurobiology. The course consists of four modules. Each module represents one of the senses & consists of an introductory lecture, one or several lectures that will delve into the details of that sense, a current topic lecture on some recent finding, & finally, a guest lecture from a UVa researcher. Completion of BIOL 3050 or PSYC 2200 or PSYC 3200 strongly recommended.

BIOL 4320

Area I

Signal Transduction: How cells talk to each other (3)
Spring 22

This advanced undergraduate course explores how cells communicate with each other and respond to their environment. This area of biology is referred to as signal transduction and is the basis for most if not all normal and disease processes in humans. Therefore, significant time is spent on defining archetypal signaling modules that all cells use to receive and communicate information to and from their environment. Prerequisites: BIOL 3000 & BIOL 3010

BIOL 4330

Area I

Wiring the Brain (3)
Spring 24

This course focuses on how relatively simple model systems provide the clues as to how certain synaptic connections form and lead to specific behaviors. This will be followed by discussion of how this knowledge can be applied to the understanding and treatment of human neural disorders. 25% of the course is standard lectures and the rest, student-led discussion of primary literature. Prereqs: BIOL 3000 & BIOL 3010; BIOL 3050 or PSYC 2200 or 3200

BIOL 4360

 

Cytokine Signaling and Neural Development (1)
Fall 21 

This is a journal club format seminar where we perform an in depth analysis of the papers listed below. One paper will be covered per week with a review article also assigned for background. There are no presenters; rather we will have discussion leaders. All participants should be prepared to present any of the panels in the week's paper.

BIOL 4390

Area I

Biological Therapy of Cancer (3)
Spring 24

This seminar course revolves around student-led presentations of primary literature in the field of cancer therapy using novel approaches including immunotherapies. Objectives include providing the student with significant exposure to primary literature and the development of critical thinking skills. Prerequisite: BIOL 3240.

BIOL 4430

Area I
Lab

Experimental Plant Biology Laboratory: Drugs & Infectious Diseases (3)
Fall 20 

We can't live without plants. Plants make our existence possible, and they hold secrets for a better future. Our experimental approach in this lab will combine genetics and genomics strategies to uncover some of those secrets. We'll search for genes and biosynthetic pathways that contribute to the success of plants at fighting off microbial infections. Ultimately, studies like these will lead to new, highly effective antimicrobial therapies. Prerequisite: BIOL 3010, BIOL 3150

BIOL 4450

Area III

Plant-Animal Interactions (3)
Fall 20
 
Plants & animals have a long co-evolutionary history, with their interactions shaping natural ecosystems, as well as our own daily lives. We'll emphasize the evolutionary and ecological implications of these interactions to consider topics, such as pollination, herbivory and dispersal. We'll also address questions like: Why is flower color, shape and scent so diverse? How do animals eat toxic plants? How do fruit help plants finds new habitat?

BIOL 4559Area II

New Course: Genetics of Metabolic Health (3)
As cutting-edge genetic tools come to complement generations of observances on diet and metabolism, we find ourselves in a position more capable than ever to map the genetic and environmental components of metabolic health. In our course, we will couple content lessons with skill-building workshops to better understand metabolic health and the genetic factors that create inequalities within society. Each class will use an inquiry-based learning approach to guide student-driven workshops in current scientific skills, including genetic tools, statistical methods, and a rich review of the literature. At the course’s conclusion students will be able to plan and present a study in which they would leverage genetic tools to ask relevant questions in the field of metabolic health.

BIOL 4559

Area II

New Course: The Science of Living Longer (3)
Spring 24

Embark on a journey into the world of aging and its impact on health! Explore why we age and how it links to diseases like diabetes, cancer, and neurodegeneration. Delve into research, uncovering molecular changes, and cutting-edge interventions. Discover the potential to revolutionize healthcare by targeting aging itself. Dive into ethical questions about extending lifespan. Join us for an educational adventure to unlock the mysteries of aging!

BIOL 4559

Area II

New Course: The Immortal Germ Line (3)
Spring 24

One of the most important characteristics of life is the ability to reproduce. In order to produce new life, multicellular organisms evolved specialized cells whose only purpose is reproduction – the germ cells. Germ cells are the only cells that persist from one generation to the next and are often called immortal. We will decipher how these totipotent stem cells function in order to faithfully create the next generation of organisms.

BIOL 4559

Area II

New Course: Physiological Mechanisms in Health and Disease (3)
Spring 24

Emphasis on the functions and integration of human nervous, cardiovascular, respiratory, digestive, and renal systems that maintain homeostasis. Normal function, from cells to organs, of each system provides a foundation for study of mechanisms that lead to dysfunction and the identification of potential therapeutic targets / strategies.

BIOL 4559

Area II

New Course: Hormones and Behavior (3) [NOW BIOL 4080]
Fall 23 

BIOL 4559

Area III

New Course: Biology of Conflict (2) [NO LONGER OFFERED]
Spring 23

BIOL 4559

Area III
Lab

New Course: Computational Evolutionary Biology (3) [NOW BIOL 4020]
Fall 23 

BIOL 4559

Area III

New Course: Mutualism: Kinder View Nature (2)
Spring 24

Mutualisms are species interaction in which both species benefit from the relationship. Mutualisms give species superpowers, allowing them to use new resources, move across space, and defend themselves against enemies. We’ll investigate the mechanisms and consequences of mutualisms that span kingdoms of life and levels of biological organization. We’ll also examine how diverse human perspectives build a more expansive understanding of nature.

BIOL
4559
Area II

New Course: Genetics of Metabolic Health (3)
Summer 24
As cutting-edge genetic tools come to complement generations of observances on diet and metabolism, we find ourselves in a position more capable than ever to map the genetic and environmental components of metabolic health. In our course, we will couple content lessons with skill-building workshops to better understand metabolic health and the genetic factors that create inequalities within society. Each class will use an inquiry-based learning approach to guide student-driven workshops in current scientific skills, including genetic tools, statistical methods, and a rich review of the literature. At the course’s conclusion students will be able to plan and present a study in which they would leverage genetic tools to ask relevant questions in the field of metabolic health.

BIOL
4559
 

New Course: Principles of Regenerative Biology
Fall 24

This course will provide an in-depth exploration of the field of regenerative biology, focusing on the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying tissue regeneration and repair in animals. Topics covered will include stem cell biology, developmental biology, modern experimental techniques, and the use of several model organisms in regenerative research. We will also explore the implications for advancing regenerative medicine.

BIOL 4585

Area II

Topics Course: How Plant Biotechnology Can Save Our Planet (2)
Spring 24

BIOL 4585

Area II

Topics Course: Topics in Developmental Biology (3)
Spring 24

The goal of this course is to introduce key concepts defining the field of developmental biology, including discussion of classic experiments using animal systems that have been crucial in clarifying these concepts. Relevance of these experiments to both normal human development and disease will be discussed. Contemporary approaches for studying developmental processes, e.g., modeling them using stem-cell based technology, will also be presented.

BIOL 4585Area I

Topics Course: Advances in Drug Discovery & Emerging Therapies​ (3)
Fall 24

BIOL 4585 Topics Course: Capstone Seminar for the BS in Biology

BIOL 4610

Area III

Molecular Evolution: Diversity, Mutants, and the Biological Myth of Race (3)
Spring 22

Through the analysis of patterns of genetic variation in DNA, the field of Molecular Evolution seeks to gain insight into the fundamental evolutionary forces that generate, maintain, and remove genetic diversity. These forces shape the abundance of deleterious and beneficial mutations and reflect physical and behavioral differences between populations. In this course, we will dive into theoretical population genetics as a framework to develop an intuitive understanding of these evolutionary processes. We will apply this understanding to diversity among humans and all other life on earth. Prerequisite: BIOL3010, BIOL3020 required; STAT 2020 and calculus (MATH 1210, 1220, 1310, or 1320) suggested.

BIOL 4660

Area I

How do they do it? Method and Logic in Biomedical Science (3)
Fall 22

How has a bioluminescent jellyfish saved lives? What does a Himalayan pond fish have to do with research into the origins of psychiatric disorders? Innovative methods in biomedical research have played a significant part in the development of revolutionary disease cures, treatments and diagnostics. This course will examine many of these technical approaches and how they have led to such significant discoveries in basic biomedical research. Prerequisite: BIOL 3010

BIOL
4751
Area IIIPlant Diversity & Conservation: Bioinformatics and Systematics (3)
Summer 24

The extraordinary diversity of the southern Appalachians will be used to explore the world of plants. We will visit unique mountain habitats to study the different species assemblages in these ecologically wide-ranging sites. Based upon our observations and analyses, we will critique contemporary views of the most effective conservation units (individual, population, species, family, habitat) and the methods used to achieve conservation goals.

BIOL 4752

Area III
Lab

Stream Ecology (3)
Summer 23
   
Students will integrate principles of stream and watershed ecology to gain insight into stream-dwelling organisms and their environments. Participants will be introduced to the physical, chemical and biological organization of aquatic ecosystems, current theories in stream and watershed ecology, and lab and field methods for conducting stream research, and will participate in field/lab explorations and student-led discussions.

BIOL 4754

Area III
Lab

Field Herpetology (3)
Summer 24

We will focus on the ecology and evolution of reptiles and amphibians, leveraging their diversity in the southeastern US. In both the field and laboratory, we will study 1) the evolutionary relationships among reptiles and amphibians, 2) key evolutionary innovations that characterize each major lineage, 3) reptile and amphibian systems in ecological and evolutionary research, and 4) location and identification of reptiles and amphibians.

BIOL 4755

Area III
Lab

Field Biology of Fishes (3)
Summer 24

MLBS sits on the Eastern Continental Divide providing an incredible diversity of freshwater habitats. Proficiency in ichthyology will be developed through field trips and lab work. Themes include: fish ID; patterns and drivers of diversity; interactions on individual, population, community and ecosystem levels; evolution; and influences of human activities. Students will design and conduct a research project and present at a class symposium.

BIOL
4761
Area IIIWildlife Disease Ecology (3)
Summer 24

This course focuses on the ecology and evolution of infectious diseases in wild animal populations. Topics include the population biology of parasites and pathogens, host immune defenses and pathogen virulence, and wildlife conservation and disease. Students will gain experience with quantitative methods and field and laboratory techniques, including parasite identification and handling of insects, birds, amphibians, and small mammals.

BIOL 4762

Area III
Lab

Field Behavioral Ecology (3)
Summer 23 
  
This course will illustrate principles of behavior and provide experience with methods used in animal behavior research. Students will develop an understanding of the scientific process as applied to behavior research, learn how behavior evolves and why we see the behavioral patterns that we do, and learn how to conduct research in wild populations. The class will work collaboratively to develop and carry out a field research project.

BIOL 4770

Area II

Synthetic Biology (3)
Summer 24

By applying the principles of engineering to biology, students will design molecules, viruses, and cells to solve global problems in public health, food security, manufacturing, information processing, and the environment, changing the traditional question of 'How do cells work?' to 'How can I get a cell to work for me?' Students will gain experience in writing internationally competitive research project proposals. Prerequisite: Instructor Permission

BIOL 4810

DMP

Distinguished Major Seminar in Biological Research I (2)
Fall 23 

Two-hour, weekly discussion of recent advances in biology; attend biology seminars, interact with seminar speakers, explore the philosophy and practice of science, and learn skills in oral and written research presentation. Prerequisite: Fourth-year DMP in Biology.

BIOL 4820

DMP

Distinguished Major Seminar in Biological Research II (2)
Spring 24

Two-hour, weekly discussion of recent advances in biology; attend biology seminars, interact with seminar speakers, explore the philosophy and practice of science, and learn skills in oral and written research presentation. Prerequisite: Fourth-year DMP in Biology.

BIOL 4900

 

Independent Study in Biology (1 - 3)
Fall 24; Spring 24

Independent study under the direction of a Biology faculty member for students to read and critically assess primary research papers and current reviews in a focused area of the life sciences. Directed readings and discussions can be used to explore how contemporary topics and research areas can be incorporated into other formal courses. Students will have the opportunity to develop both scientific writing and oral presentation skills.

BIOL 4910

Lab

Independent Research in the Life Sciences (2)
Fall 24; Spring 24

Undergraduate research in the field of broadly defined biology under the mentorship of a UVA professor who doesn't belong to the Biology Department.  The research mentor must hold a title of Professor, Associate Professor, or Assistant Professor in any departments or programs at UVA (Research Assistant Professors, Research Associates, and Graduate Students are excluded).   Students should obtain verbal consent from the professor for mentorship before registering themselves to BIOL4910 on SIS.  A form will be sent to the registered students on which they enter information about their mentors and their official approval for mentorship. For application instructions, see the section 'How to Enroll in Independent Research with a Faculty Member Outside of the Biology Department' at: https://bio.as.virginia.edu/undergraduate/research. Prerequisite: Instructor Permission

BIOL 4920

Lab

Independent Research in Biology (2)
Fall 24; Spring 24

Independent research for qualified undergraduates under the direction of a faculty member within the Biology Department. Prerequisite: Instructor Permission

BIOL 4930

DMP

Distinguished Major Thesis Research (2)
Spring 24

This course is the final semester of Independent Research for participants of the Biology Distinguished Majors Program. During this semester, students will complete their laboratory investigations, ultimately presenting the sum of their work in a written thesis. Prerequisite: Instructor Permission

BIOL 5070

 

Practical Aspects of Light Microscopy in the Biological Sciences (3)
Spring 24

Practical usage of various microscopy imaging methodologies to study the morphology and cellular function in various biological systems from single cell to single molecule in cells and tissues. Topics include basics theory of microscopy, imaging and image analysis to solve various biological questions, fluorophore labeling, technical and hands on training on various microscopy techniques applied in different biological and biomedical investigations. Lectures, discussion, student presentations and laboratory.